{ 22 comments… read them below or add one }

Simon Pritchard July 10, 2016 at 7:12 am

Better than the last time we did it!

Few points you may find useful…

Mountain Training (body responsible for developing nationally-recognised mountain and climbing leaders and skills awards) define a mountain as being over 600m in height (not caring about prominence, that’s a whole other discussion!!)

Your readers may prefer seeing the way to pronounce ‘Du’ as ‘dee’ – don’t want them thinking ‘di’ as sounding like ‘die’.

Great pics as always – where’s next?

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Charles July 10, 2016 at 1:01 pm

Much better! We were very grateful for your guidance. Yes, thanks for the pronunciation tip. I should probably change it in the body of the piece but then people won’t know what you are talking about. 600m a “mountain” ? Well really…..
The Knoydart peninsular is next. Then back to Pen Y Fan on the Cambrian Way. Now that was an exhausting day.

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Simon Pritchard July 10, 2016 at 1:09 pm

I’ve switched to cycling for a while. Doing a 75kms road event next weekend, but contemplating a 60kms mountain bike event over the Beacons (inc the Gap road you mentioned) in Sept. It’s called the “Brecon Beast” (for good reason). I’ve seen quite a few people combine Knoydart with a canoe / pack raft – another good challenge!

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Charles July 10, 2016 at 1:23 pm

Simply bonkers! But we all have to die somehow.

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Bob July 10, 2016 at 8:41 am

Glad to be the first to comment. Stunning photography as always. This is not influenced by being in a high proportion of them myself.
One of our vey best walks. Very happy that my chronic Achilles problem remains in remission.

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Charles July 10, 2016 at 1:08 pm

Hehe. You do feature a lot, don’t you. Mind you, there is lot’s of you to feature. Very pleased that your foot is still good. Xx

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Paul Steer July 10, 2016 at 11:16 am

Bob makes a good photograph – I found myself chuckling at them for some reason – sorry Bob.
Yes stunning photographs and an inticing way up and off the MOUNTAINS.
Hills indeed !

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John Kingdon July 10, 2016 at 12:03 pm

Well, there is no clear definition of what the minimum height of a mountain should be. There used to be a (unfounded) belief that OS defined a mountain as 1000ft; OED says 2000 ft. Charles would probably accept that Snowdon is a mountain but he would equally have to accept that Ben Nevis (which is higher) is a hill – there are no mountains in Scotland. The consensus these days is that something becomes a mountain if that’s what people call it. So Pen-y-Fan is a mountain.

Then again, I wouldn’t pronounce “Corn Du” as “Corn Di” but, rather “Corn Dee” (with a guttural undertone). But overall, Charles will be Charles and as it’s his blog we should humour him. And he does give us nice photos to look at. 🙂

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Simon Pritchard July 10, 2016 at 12:23 pm

For some reason, my comment this morning didn’t go through; but I said almost exactly the same as far as pronunciation is concerned.

As far as the hill or mountain debate, Mountain Training define one as having a height in excess of 600m (no mention of prominence – I’m not going there!). Based on this, Pen-Y-Fan is well in…

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Charles July 10, 2016 at 1:22 pm

Sorry about that. My software should recognise you by now!

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Charles July 10, 2016 at 1:19 pm

This mountain discussion is fun. It seems that the OED is close to Simon’s 2,000 feet. Do they just have Munros in Scotland, then? And Corbets, of course. More of them anon. But I think I would have to have the debate refer to the difference between a peak and it’s surroundings. I mean a plain at 2,000 feet is not a mountain range. Yes, “Dee” is right but I’m afraid Simon got in there first, so the Mars bar goes to him. Well, it did.

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John Kingdon July 10, 2016 at 1:38 pm

Seems the Scots have “Bens” and anything over 3000 ft is a “Munro”. I’ve heard “Och! That’s just a little mound.” That was someone talking about Ben Nevis!

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Charles July 10, 2016 at 1:21 pm

Don’t encourage him- he’ll be after modelling fees. Honestly, you Welsh are so tetchy.

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Neil July 10, 2016 at 2:15 pm

Well, very disappointed in you Charles for not climbing Fan-y-Big. Just you pull your socks up and do the proper thing next time 🙂

Fun to read this account given our recent outing . Another fabulous day, and great views !!!

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Charles July 10, 2016 at 2:28 pm

Sshh – don’t let on. Only real mountain climbers do Fan Y Big.

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Kev the Yank July 10, 2016 at 10:47 pm

Such beautiful photos!! As soon as Grace sees them I know she will be on her computer plotting our return trip so we can go to the Beacons…. Did you read her last couple of posts where she was talking about really really wanting to return…. SOON. Wonder who that was meant for??

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Charles July 11, 2016 at 8:40 am

Thanks Kevin! The Beacons are fabulous. On the Cambrian Way we are traversing a large chunk of them. A two-day trek (which brought us back to Pen-y-Fan) will be here, soon. I shall buy some bunting and buns in anticipation of your return,

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Nigel July 11, 2016 at 1:49 pm

I’m walking up there ten times in twenty four hours next Saturday so I hope it’s going to be a fine day like you had
The walk is for Latch Welsh Childrens Cancer charity see my Just Giving page:
https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/nigel-pearce1

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Charles July 11, 2016 at 1:55 pm

Wow! That will be an extraordinary achievement. Hope you raise lots of money!

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John Kingdon July 11, 2016 at 1:58 pm

Nigel – your comment ended with a colon. Can you post a link to the JG page, please? We can then sponsor you for the the walks down!

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John Kingdon July 11, 2016 at 1:58 pm

Soz, it just appeared as if by magic.

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Kev the Yank July 11, 2016 at 3:02 pm

Good luck Nigel!!

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