Post image for Day 5: The Way of St James between Aumont Aubrac to Nasbinals (16.2 miles)

Day 5: The Way of St James between Aumont Aubrac to Nasbinals (16.2 miles)

September 22, 2012 · 11 comments

Our itinerary and all our accommodation was arranged by Sherpa Walking Holidays.

We had quite a lot of rain in the night, but as dawn broke it revealed just a slightly drizzly morning.

The croissants were good and they declined to accept my offer of payment for last nights wine. My French really wasn’t up to clarifying that we had not paid for it.

A fresh loaf of dark doughy bread, some more tomatoes and a dry sausage purchased we headed off into the mist, soon passing under the A 75 autoroute.

As graffiti goes, I think was pretty good.

Graffiti in underpsass of A75 near Aumont Aubrac. Walking The Way of St James, photograph by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

A mile or so after the A75 we arrived at La Chaze de Peyre.

It has all essential facilities.

Sign at Chaze de la Peyre on the way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

And a little church in the square.

Church in Chaz de Peyre on The Way of St James, France, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

A short while later we reached the D987 road and the pretty little Chapelle de Bastide.

Chapelle de Bastide near Chaz de Peyre, on the way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

The countryside was changing from predominantly woodland to more arable land with friendly livestock.

Donkey between Aumont Aubrac and nasbinals on the Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

Cow between Aumont Aubrac and nasbinals on the Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

And then to a much more open landscape.

Path between Aumont Aubrac and nasbinals on the Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

I haven’t shown you the way mark signs. They frequently appear on walls, trees, buildings and make the written descriptions of the path almost unnecessary.

Waymark sign (showing route straight ahead) between Aumont Aubrac and nasbinals on the Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

Although I loved walking through the woodlands yesterday this spacious open land has its own charm and lots of beautiful cattle.

Beautiful Aubrac cattle between Aumont Aubrac and nasbinals on the Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

Isn’t she gorgeous!

Beautiful Aubrac cattle between Aumont Aubrac and nasbinals on the Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

Between la Fouelle and our destination we were reminded of the Yorkshire Dales but these occasional massive boulders distinguished it from the more familiar British landscape.

Rocks near la Fouelle between Aumont Aubrac and Nasbinals on The Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

And the lichen encrusted walls were of granite.

Granite dry stone wall

In this part of the world most buildings are roofed with attractive curved slates.

Stone tiles with curved edge between Aumont Aubrac and Nasbinals on the Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

The red-berried sorbus are the main remaining trees and positively glow in the landscape.

Sorbus between Aumont Aubrac and Nasbinals on the Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

By 12.30 we had walked 11 miles and we lunched here. It was hot and sunny now and the views were fabulous.

View between Aumont Aubrac and Nasbinals on the Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

Before reaching Nasbinals the path drops down to a river near Montgros and we walked along the totally quiet D900 to cross this pretty bridge.

Bridge over the river near Montgros between Aumont Aubrac and Nasbinals on the Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

As we climbed up to our highest point of the days walk at 4000 feet I chatted to French man in his 70’s who was meeting his granddaughter in Nasbinals. I managed a good 20 minutes of simple conversation, which I was rather pleased about.

And I said hello to another donk,

Donkey between Aumont Aubrac and Nasbinals on the Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

We were both pretty tired by this time but this didn’t tempt us.

Advert for taxi service between Aumont Aubrac and Nasbinals on the Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St Jacques. GR65

Though from the look of Bobs big toe, we might have problems tomorrow. Stop reading now if you’re squeamish.

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Ok, I need to concentrate now. We had a weird starter of a savoury bread thing with ratatouille followed by thin cut pork chop with disgusting cheesy potatoes followed by an excellent chessboard which we destroyed , then a choc mouse.

To drink:

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And then

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And then it all got out of hand.

Photograph of Charles Hawes at the Hotel in Nasbinals on the Way of St James, photographed by Robert Pinder. Route St Jacques. GR65

{ 11 comments… read them below or add one }

Anne Wareham September 22, 2012 at 3:47 pm

Yuk!!! We didn’t need to see it!

Glad you found some toilets and drinking water: this blog is improving by the day.

Apart from toe nails.

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Charles September 22, 2012 at 4:03 pm

This is a warts and all blog. My toenails are fine, thank you.
Xx

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Anne Wareham September 22, 2012 at 4:18 pm

We can do without your warts too..

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John September 22, 2012 at 4:56 pm

Poor Bob! But that toe looks like a fungal infection rather than wear and tear from walking. If so, it won’t get painful for ages yet, if ever. Just watch for any sign of a little split in the nail (a plaster will protect it if needed).

I would be suspicious of a loo which advertised drinking water as the French are getting the recycling habit!

I am also getting suspicious of your taste in females though I would go so far as to say she has rather alluring eyes!

And I limit myself to one exclamation mark per paragraph though have graduated to a double pimp, did you notice?

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Charles September 23, 2012 at 5:20 am

Thanks for your opinion about the toe and I passed on your sympathy! I have had complaints about the toe graphics, so readers here may have to be content with references only. Photographs of the progress if the toe will be available, though, on request.

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John September 23, 2012 at 1:34 pm

You haven’t nailed removal of that pic yet but the new last one gives rise to excruciatingly painful aches in my head as I imagine the singing and so distracts from the earlier one.

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Charles September 23, 2012 at 3:47 pm

The nail stays – on the blog. Jury’s still out about if it remains on the foot.

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Gillian September 22, 2012 at 5:50 pm

What lovely walking countryside and cute donkeys. Not so keen on the toe, though. Those curved slates are very common here in Ariège, lovely aren’t they. I’m glad you found a dépôt de pain today and ‘I didn’t have enough French to tell her we didn’t pay for the wine’ is the best excuse I’ve heard in a while. All in all you’re best post so far.

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Charles September 23, 2012 at 3:46 pm

Hi Gilly! I did like the donkeys but I want to bring home one of the cows and buy a field for it, just so I can see it everyday. More of them today! Yes, top notch excuse for non payment of booze eh!

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Maggie September 23, 2012 at 10:22 am

This blog and the photographs is wonderful, the latter make all the difference. I feel as though I am almost there with you.
Sorry about the bells this morning though!
I want to know and see photos of the poorly toe even if Anne doesn’t.
Waiting for next installment x

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Charles September 23, 2012 at 3:50 pm

That’s a lovely comment Maggie. XX.
Hope you stay with me. Feels nice to think of you (and the other select band of followers) being alongside.

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