Post image for Day 7: The Way of St James from Chely D’Aubrac to St. Come d’Olt (10miles)

Day 7: The Way of St James from Chely D’Aubrac to St. Come d’Olt (10miles)

September 24, 2012 · 8 comments

Our itinerary and all our accommodation was arranged by Sherpa Walking Holidays.

It was tipping it down when I looked out of the window at 7, this morning. And it was still raining by the time we left the hotel at 8.45. Well, that’s why we carry waterproofs.

A lot of people are walking the GR 65 with us and by now each day involves many cheery “bonjours” to familiar faces as we congregate in bars, dining rooms and on the route.

The path climbed steadily out of our valley along a minor road and then a farm track through beechwoods.

Setting off in the rain on The Way of St James between Chel D'Aubrac and St. Come d'Olt photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

Walkers in the woods on The Way of St James between Chel D'Aubrac and St. Come d'Olt photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

We were nowhere near as high as yesterday and the clouds that were racing in front of us and delivering lashings of rain obscured most of the view anyway.

Clud filled valley on The Way of St James between Chel D'Aubrac and St. Come d'Olt photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

Having reached a plateau where we walked briefly along a quiet Tarmac road we began a long slow descent through more beechwoods into the valley of the St Chaly d’Aubrac river.

At the little hamlet of L’Estrade I lost the track but my mistake was quickly obvious and it gave me a chance to see some more decrepit houses that comprises half the buildings in these isolated places.

Hamlet of L'Estrade on The Way of St James between Chely D'Aubrac and St. Come d'Olt photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

And just past here we came across one of the informal places of refreshment and rest that pepper the route. It was doing a good trade today. Just a self-serve hot drink, but that’s all that was needed. I discovered that my very expensive Montane Jacket was simply not keeping me dry, but my OR over-trousers were doing a great job.

Walkers sheltering from the rain on on The Way of St James between Chely D'Aubrac and St. Come d'Olt photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

The rain was easing and the walkers were quite spread out by now, and I was really enjoying the quiet trek. Bob was going more slowly than me but that was fine for both of us.

Just past La Roziere we had a wonderful informal lunch “Chez Muriel”. Situated almost at the top of the valley, Muriel provides food and drink from her back garden to grateful walkers. She was chatty and friendly and we had a superb cross between a crepe and an omelette followed by coffee and fabulous cake- mine with figs, Bobs with plums.

First course:

lunch at Chex Muriel near La Roziere on on The Way of St James between Chely D'Aubrac and St. Come d'Olt photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

I look glum I think but I was perfectly OK!

Photograpgh of Charles Hawes Chex Muriel on on The Way of St James between Chely D'Aubrac and St. Come d'Olt photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

We only had a few more miles to go and it was nearly all downhill. The geology was now limestone rather than granite.

Limestone walls on on The Way of St James between Chely D'Aubrac and St. Come d'Olt photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

Beech gave way to Chestnut and as we dropped further, I saw several walnuts.

The descent towards St Come d'OLt on on The Way of St James between Chely D'Aubrac and St. Come d'Olt photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

I saw very few of my beloved Aubracs.

Aubrac cattle in a field on on The Way of St James between Chely D'Aubrac and St. Come d'Olt photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

Everywhere, though, throughout these last 6 days, we have seen pollarded ash.

Pollarded ash trees on on The Way of St James between Chely D'Aubrac and St. Come d'Olt photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

We began to get some sunny breaks in the clouds as we neared St Come d’Olt.

Hills above St Come d'Olt on on The Way of St James between Chely D'Aubrac and St. Come d'Olt photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

We are staying in this massive convent on the edge of the town. It felt a bit intimidating as we approached. Our rooms are without decoration. I hope the food is good.

The town is said by some British Guides to be one of the prettiest in France. So we are off to have a look. And a beer. And to play some crib.

Convert at St Come d'Olt on The Way of St James photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

The food was not goo. It was horrible canteen food and I left most of mine.  Yuk. So here’s our lovely lunch to end this post on a nicer tone.

 

Lunch at Chez Muriel on on The Way of St James between Chely D'Aubrac and St. Come d'Olt photographed by Charles Hawes. Route St jacques. GR65

{ 8 comments… read them below or add one }

Julia September 24, 2012 at 2:44 pm

Hope you enjoying the chestnut woods- magnificent large fruits of a glorious limey green. Also a few CEOs around.

Reply

Charles September 24, 2012 at 6:08 pm

I have loved all the woods. All differing characters. Having been to Italy in October and walked in chestnut woods in the sun, with the ground covered in nuts almost the size of golf balls, I am difficult to impress for chestnuts.

Reply

Julia September 24, 2012 at 2:45 pm

For CEO read ceps!

Reply

Charles September 24, 2012 at 6:10 pm

Have been looking out for them but only seen some on a market stall.

Reply

Anne Wareham September 24, 2012 at 3:45 pm

After all that trouble your jacket leaks!! (He spent so much money and time trying to get really weather proof equipment.) That’s BAD.

Hope it’s fun, staying in a convent…..XXXXXX

Reply

Charles September 24, 2012 at 6:13 pm

I will be taking this up with Montain, but I wasn’t soaked. No the convent is not fun and the food was disgusting. But am warm and I have a comfy bed, so not down about it.

Reply

Paul Steer September 24, 2012 at 6:33 pm

That cake looked good. No convent jokes, it sounds a bit grim, but warm and dry is good. I wonder why those sad cottages haven’t been bought up by wealthy Brits and renovated as holiday retreats.

Reply

Charles September 24, 2012 at 6:48 pm

Hello Paul! Yes, hundreds and hundreds of places of varied size and great character. But this really is a remote area. No decent sized towns for miles and roads get cut off by snow in winter.

Reply

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post:

Copyright Charles Hawes (2012)