Post image for Day 2: The Way of St James from St Privat D’Allier to Sauges (11.9 miles)

Day 2: The Way of St James from St Privat D’Allier to Sauges (11.9 miles)

September 19, 2012 · 9 comments

Our itinerary and all our accommodation was arranged by Sherpa Walking Holidays.

I woke at 6 before my alarm. But I wasn’t unhappy about that. It meant that I had time for a leisurely cup of tea. Travel kettles are a wonderful invention and essential in France. The aspect of civilisation that provides tea making facilities in hotel rooms having so far eluded them.

It was raining steadily so we donned our wet weather gear and tried to persuade ourselves of our good fortune in this having lighter packs to carry.

I was reluctant to get the phone out in the rain, but this boulder in the path got me wondering about why walkers seem to want to pile stones up at every opportunity.

Boulder in the Path of The way of St James photographed by Charles Hawes

At the top of the hill the hamlet of Rochegude boasts two ancient structures. It was wet so I only explored the nearest one to the path,

This chapel is devoted to St Jacques and was open.

l'Esglise St Jacques at Rochegude on The Way of St James between Privat d'Allier and Sauges, photographed by Charles Hawes

And appeared to have a congregation- of walkers, perhaps.

l'Esglise St Jacques at Rochegude on The Way of St James between Privat d'Allier and Sauges, photographed by Charles Hawes

l'Esglise St Jacques at Rochegude on The Way of St James between Privat d'Allier and Sauges, photographed by Charles Hawes

We pressed on through the mist and drizzle to arrive at Monistrol D’Allier. The impressive gorge looking better in this view than from the other side of the bridge where a hydro electric station rather dominates the valley.

River Valley at Monistrol D'Allier on The way of St James between Privat'Dallier and Sauges, photographed by Charles Hawes

From Monistrol the path climbs over 1300 feet. But it snakes around the valley side, and I was seldom out of breath. Bob weighs 3 stone more than me and his progress was a little more laboured.

And we did get some wonderful views as the rain eased off and the mist lifted.

River Valley at Monistrol D'Allier on The way of St James between Privat'Dallier and Sauges, photographed by Charles Hawes

We passed through several sleepy hamlets with equally slumbering dogs. The Shepherd of this lot had 4 of the beasts but they only paid us a cursory interest.

Sheep on the path on The way of St James between St Private D'Allier and Sauges, photographed by Charles Hawes

We made good progress as the land levelled out and the sun re-appeared.

Walking The way of St James between St Privat D'Allier and Suages, photographed by Charles Hawes

As we began to descend to Sauges works of art started appearing . More stones being piled up on some.

Carved wooden sculpture on the outskirts of Sauges on The Way of St James, photographed by Charles Hawes

We arrived at 2.15. The restaurant was still busy with lunchers. All we wanted was a bath and a snooze. I had the bath. This blog deprived me of the snooze as the software was playing merry hell. I now need a drink.

Actually I admit to having several before we entered the smart dining room of our Hotel de Terrasse. An excellent supper of leak and potato soup, a rare beef steak with a puréed something that was questionable, and the most excellent cheeseboard. I had 6, Bob 5, Le Patron said we could have asked for 20.

Cheesboard in the Hotel de Terrasse, Sauges, photographed by Charles Hawes

{ 9 comments… read them below or add one }

Anne Wareham September 19, 2012 at 4:18 pm

Well done. Good to see the sights – and congratulations on sorting your software problems! (And glad to hear you’re 3 stone lighter than Bob – is that right??? No wonder you’re only showing his behind). (But then you always just show your fellow walker’s behinds… curious…)

XXXXXX

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Charles September 19, 2012 at 7:54 pm

Yes, Bob is a bit fat but it doesn’t stop me living him. You know I have a bit if a thing about bottoms.

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Julia September 19, 2012 at 5:34 pm

Pic of altar like an impressionistic piece of artwork. The fact that you can blog on b i phone impresses me too.

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Charles September 19, 2012 at 7:56 pm

Well I love to impress but I was tearing my hair out earlier as text kept disappearing and pics kept appetising twice. But thank you. See you tomorrow?

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Jessica A. Hawes September 19, 2012 at 6:58 pm

Am enjoying your pics and admiring your stamina. Brother Nigel very impressed. love, Ma

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Charles September 19, 2012 at 7:57 pm

Thanks Mum. Have emailed you and Nigel for important advice about the cheeseboard.

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Nigel Buxton September 20, 2012 at 6:29 am

Can’t make out the names in the picture.I would probably just ask for VIEUX CANTAL, for me one of best cheeses in the world and very Auvergne.Deriving great pleasure from walking along with you. That ‘boulder’ looks very much like a cannon-ball. Stone-pilers are one of the curses wished upon us by whatever gods we have offended. Every stone a small mind.

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Lynds Jennings September 20, 2012 at 4:58 pm

Cheeseboard envy here- maybe why the pics were app itising twice 🙂 Looks a beautiful area ,have fun !

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Charles September 21, 2012 at 7:54 pm

The whole cheeseboard thing is a delight and an anxiety. But well worth experiencing both!

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Copyright Charles Hawes (2012)